Can you paint over clear coat – Clear away the myths on painting

There are specific tasks in life which generally do not need outsourcing, and can be done by our own selves if we have enough information about them. For example, painting, changing a tire, essential repair work, and such common household tasks have been proved to be easy enough to accomplish on our own, but practice and information or experience is always vital in such processes. Painting is one of the most important household processes, which has to be done after regular intervals and can be an expensive feat if done by professionals. But, painting has proved to be easy enough to do on our own, with the proper tools and adequate information about the types of paints and basic ground rules.

Can We Paint Over A Clear Coat?

can you paint over clear coat

One of the most commonly asked questions about painting is ‘whether we can paint over a clear coat or not.’ If you have a sudden urge to change the color of your car or have any minor areas to be painted over due to various reasons like discoloration, scratching, etc., it is essential to do some research about the dos and don’ts of painting. If your car has a clear coat already, you can apply a robust oil-based primer first, wait 24 hours for it to dry completely and sand it lightly with good quality sandpaper before applying the topcoat. This is also applicable for kitchen cabinets, drawers, doors, etc.

The use of a chemical component called ‘trisodium phosphate’ is also widely recommended to help in gently de-glossing the clear coat. There are also environmentally viable substitutes of TSP, which can be found and applied; it helps in reducing the shiny finish of the clear coat. After that, a primer with specialties in adhesive and gripping abilities to help the actual paint stick to the clear coat, otherwise it might leave irregular patches on the surface. Once the primer is fully dry, it serves as an efficient undercoat for almost any paint alternative. The best type of paint to be used over a clear coat would be a glossy or semi-gloss latex acrylic paint, which can be wiped clean easily, are stain and dust resistant, and have a fade-resistant color range.

If you directly apply the paint over a clear coat, it simply will not stick, and you might find an imperfect or splotchy paint job, which would ultimately be more expensive to correct. So, before handling any such tasks, it is better to search about the consequences and sample a small area before finishing it off ultimately.

Other Such Myths Related To Painting

There are many other myths related to painting, where some are silly presumptions. At the same time, some are obsolete statements that actually made sense in the past, but have been overcome by the present updates and technologies. One such myth is ‘not to paint in cold temperatures,’ this myth was derived from the idea that when the temperature falls below 50 degrees, the paint starts losing some of its adhesive properties and ability to dry. But, with the help of the latest paint technologies, cold-weather paints are available now.

Another myth is that if we apply multiple coats of paint, there is no need for primer. The best way to tackle this myth is to buy ‘paint and primer in one’ type of paints, which aids in handling two steps in one go. Primer helps the paint look pleasing, creates a uniform finish, and helps to block stains.

An amusing myth about painting is that the majority of people doubt their abilities and firmly believe that they need professional help to paint and cannot do it by themselves. Even if you do not have any previous painting experience, you can always take up the job yourself, and this way you can save a lot of money. Just be sure to search or watch any tutorials beforehand, to avoid common mistakes.

In conclusion, such day-to-day tasks might seem daunting to complete on our own, but once we get the hang of it, we can end up saving a considerable amount of money by not hiring any outside help. There are many alternatives in the market which cater to various specifications and requirements

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